Burp Suite, the leading toolkit for web application security testing

Installing Burp's CA Certificate

By default, when you browse an HTTPS website via Burp, the Proxy generates an SSL certificate for each host, signed by its own Certificate Authority (CA) certificate. This CA certificate is generated the first time Burp is run, and stored locally. To use Burp Proxy most effectively with HTTPS websites, you will need to install Burp's CA certificate as a trusted root in your browser.

Note: If you install a trusted root certificate in your browser, then an attacker who has the private key for that certificate may be able to man-in-the-middle your SSL connections without obvious detection, even when you are not using an intercepting proxy. To protect against this, Burp generates a unique CA certificate for each installation, and the private key for this certificate is stored on your computer, in a user-specific location. If untrusted people can read local data on your computer, you may not wish to install Burp's CA certificate.

For full instructions on installing Burp's CA certificate in your browser, please refer to the following article in the Burp Suite Support Center:

This article contains detailed steps for installing the CA certificate on various common browsers and mobile devices.

Support Center

Get help and join the community discussions at the Burp Suite Support Center.

Visit the Support Center ›

Monday, October 19, 2015


This release updates Burp to include a security fix in the BlazeDS library that Burp uses for parsing AMF messages, and disables AMF support by default.

Burp's cookie jar has been updated to support the cookie path attribute.

The functions to save and restore state now include options for handling the unique identifier that Burp uses to track interactions with Burp Collaborator.

See all release notes ›

Copyright © 2015 PortSwigger Ltd. All rights reserved.